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  • Lemonade stand

    Posted on November 28th, 2011 Alan No comments

    Photo sent to me by childhood friend Randy Sawyer. Chris and Lisa Dunn also pictured.

  • LTYA Rookie (10u) Mets Win Post Season Tournament

    Posted on May 24th, 2011 Alan No comments

    The Cardinals beat us in the 2nd round but after defeating the Rays in the loser’s bracket, we faced the Cardinals in the championship game, won, and played them two hours later and beat them decisively 19-7 to win the tournament.

    Video Highlights of Season

    Kristen’s Video Highlights

  • David vs JR

    Posted on April 30th, 2011 Alan No comments

    This is a video I made from a 1 on 1 XBOX Halo 3 cage match between David and a friend.  I had recently watched the movie Inside Man with Clive Owen where the song Chaiyya Chaiyya was featured.  I liked the song and knew I’d find a video to use it in.

  • Kristen’s Breakout game. No turning back now.

    Posted on February 10th, 2011 Alan No comments

    Kristen shoots 63% to score 30 of her team’s 38 points.  For the first time she drives to the basket, and sinks several shots from the outside. This was her first time playing organized basketball. Every team had 1 or 2 HotShot players.  She did not make the HotShots team.

  • Snow Day Feb 4, 2011 and 1973!

    Posted on February 5th, 2011 Alan No comments

    It snowed last night!

    Checkout the Snow Day from 1973 on Loyola Lane. Click the picture for a slideshow of that day.

  • Guesstures

    Posted on January 1st, 2011 Alan No comments

    Kristen got the game Guesstures from her Grandma in Dallas for Christmas.  Besides being a fun game, it has special meaning to Jane and I.  Jane and I met at a party in Dallas and that’s the game we played that night.   I didn’t actually call Jane for a date until more than a year later!

  • Garrett and Cristina Robins Wedding Video

    Posted on December 21st, 2010 Alan No comments

    Video from my niece’s wedding.

  • tinyurl

    Posted on November 29th, 2010 Alan No comments

    When I want to share a web page that has a long honkin address I go to tinurl.com and create a shorter address that redirects to the original link.  There are other services that do this.

    I’ve created:

    http://tinyurl.com/lttomahawks
    (http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7B4DF86AE633035C)

    http://tinyurl.com/ltcheer
    (http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E79E13953BCDBF36)

    http://tinyurl.com/kristenbb (Not Working)

    (http://www.youtube.com/my_playlists?p=8A6C34C04F860F91)

    http://tinyurl.com/garrettcristina
    (http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=8AB6EB7DCFE443A1)

    http://tinyurl.com/McCollumBB2010
    (http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FE1AE7F58A7CB8F3
    )

    http://tinyurl.com/iphonespellcheck
    (https://picasaweb.google.com/alankley/IPhone?feat=email#slideshow/5570003804618535074)

    http://tinyurl.com/lonestargoldpride
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=058B891D688502C1

    http://tinyurl.com/maggiosrred2011
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CE555C4BB3D94E74

    http://tinyurl.com/astrossingleafall2011
    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0CFD7B0FDAFB7DA6

    http://tinyurl.com/ladycavsfall2011

    http://tinyurl.com/girlstrue


  • Why Average Should Be The New Excellent

    Posted on September 16th, 2010 Alan No comments

    I am reprinting an article I came across. The original is linked at the end of this post.
    This is also posted on the Lake Travis Parents site.

    Are we pushing our kids too hard?

    It’s a natural instinct to push our kids to succeed. We only want the best for them, after all. But are we damaging our children by teaching them that their choices are limited to either success or failure?

    Our children grow up under the crushing weight of all our hopes and dreams for them. As they master crawling, walking and talking, we plan their futures. We imagine ourselves standing gracefully on the White House lawn, in the front row at the Academy Awards, waiting in the wings in Stockholm, courtside at the NBA finals. The child who absently bangs a few notes on the piano as he passes by is nurtured with lessons, his innate talent praised. The girl who twirls joyfully in the park is signed up for ballet and gymnastics lessons the next afternoon.

    All over the world, parents push their children to succeed, to be the best, to excel. And that’s fantastic, except that the reality is that most of our children will not be world-famous whatevers or the greatest fill-in-the-blanks of all time. Most of us, after all, are fairly ordinary. Oh, sure, we’re really good at something or other, and we enjoy relative success in our chosen fields, but are we world-renowned? Are we turning down endorsement opportunities or juggling our schedules to give back-to-back keynotes at conferences on different continents or inspiring unauthorized autobiographies? Are we even writing unauthorized biographies? Most of us are not.

    EMBRACE ORDINARY

    What’s critical is that our kids understand that even though we want the best for them, “the best” is relative. We want them to try, to dream, to reach, but we also need to ensure that they understand that normal does not necessarily mean mediocre, and that mediocre does not define their character, even if they can’t cure cancer or play in the NFL — or even make the JV team in high school.

    People can be ordinary and still make a difference in the world. People can be average and still be extraordinary. And before you brush away that word disdainfully, before you discount average, consider this: Average is what you pray for during pregnancy. If you don’t believe it, just ask any parent of a child with special needs.

    DREAM — AND DO

    Dreams matter. Of course they matter. Of course we want greatness for our children. But we don’t want them to be so paralyzed by the thought of greatness that they fail to do anything meaningful with their lives. Life, in general, is not an all-or-nothing proposition. Our children deserve the chance to experiment, to dabble, to be free to aspire to normalcy. To do, without worrying about success or failure. To do. To be.

    UNCONDITIONAL LOVE

    It’s not, “I’ll love you even if you can’t be the best or no matter what you do.” It’s, “I love you.” That intrinsic, essential, fundamental thing that makes your son your son is why you love him. Unconditional love means you don’t put conditions on it. It sounds obvious, but it’s something that’s easy to forget.

    Hopes and dreams are a good thing. They’re an important part of parenting. But an equally important part is to remind yourself — and your child — that those hopes and dreams are there to inspire, not to crush. The only weight your child should feel on his shoulders is his head held high with pride in who he is now, at this moment.

    Here is a link to the original article posted on SheKnows.com and written by Abbi Perets:
    Are we pushing our kids too hard? Why Average Should Be The New Excellent.

  • Lake Travis Parents

    Posted on September 11th, 2010 Alan No comments

    I’ve recently spoken to several parents about their kids school schedule because we were wanting to make some adjustments to Cassidy’s.  It helps to know the experience of other parents with kids in LTISD, especially if they have older kids!   I got some great insights and information from friends which motivated me to setup a blog to help us share our experiences and offer advice.  Lake Travis Parents is now live and I invite everyone to visit, subscribe to it (via RSS) and to register so that you can be a part of the discussion.  You don’t even HAVE to be a Lake Travis parent!  Registration is not required to post comments.  Click here to check it out.