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  • Kristen Kleymeyer ’19 Sand Volleyball 2017

    Posted on July 5th, 2017 Alan No comments

  • Select Volleyball: Is switching clubs to try to land on a higher team a good idea?

    Posted on June 15th, 2017 Alan No comments

    As Select Volleyball tryout season quickly approaches I hear a buzz about players considering trying out with competing clubs. My all means if you feel a different club will prepare your player better go for it. But if you are simply trying to get on a “better” team, or feel your current club doesn’t value your player’s abilities, then you might want to rethink your decision to switch clubs.

    This is a nice article that addresses this topic.

    Here are some highlights:

    “In my daily conversations with college coaches they look for factors that have nothing to do with whether the athlete is on the 1’s team or 2’s team.”

    “When you are recruiting a student-athlete, what are your thoughts when they switch clubs to ‘make a higher number team’, in turn does this negatively affect your position in their recruitment?”
    Of the 75 coaches I surveyed, 55 (73%) responded that it would negatively affect their view of the athlete if she switched clubs just to make a higher number team. They would believe the athlete to be more concerned with recognition over key factors such as training, competitiveness and being prepared to play at the next level. Ironically, almost all of the 55 coaches shared that if the athlete was making the switch based upon higher level training or the opportunity to play another position that would enhance her potential to be recruited, then it would not be considered a detriment to her recruitment.

    Before making your decision, find out exactly what your role will be for your team. Too often players choose the 1’s team and end up playing only a fraction of each match or barely see playing time at all. This makes it difficult for a college coach to evaluate a player at a tournament. Coach Jenny McDowell, Head Women’s Volleyball Coach at Emory University believes it is valuable to gain playing time. “For me, it does not matter if a player plays on the 1’s or 2’s team… it just depends on the level of the player. I would much rather have a player play for the 2’s team than sit on the bench for the 1’s team.”

    Greg Reitz, Head Women’s and Men’s Volleyball Coach at Lourdes University states “many times the kids on the 2’s team get to play more consistently, for example a 6 rotation right side or outside hitter. That usually doesn’t happen on a 1’s team because you are chosen to play a position, in addition to your teammates the Defensive Specialists that fill the roster.”

  • Kristen Kleymeyer ’19 Basketball Varsity 2016-2017

    Posted on February 13th, 2017 Alan No comments

  • Kristen Kleymeyer ’19 Volleyball Varsity 2016-2017

    Posted on February 13th, 2017 Alan No comments

  • Why David loves being an Aggie

    Posted on February 5th, 2017 Alan No comments

    How is David doing in his freshman year at A&M?  He’s doing great!  This video illustrates how good A&M is at making students feel welcome and helping them fit in.
    David had his first Lacrosse game vs Texas State Friday night.  They won but It would not have mattered to the more than 30 friends that showed up to cheer him on!

    These friends are from his Freshman Reaching Excellence in Engineering club (F.R.E.E).  Their website describes themselves as: “The organization serves to create events that promote the unity and leadership of all freshman engineers. “.  I would have to say, mission accomplished!  F.R.E.E. is just one of several freshman leadership organizations under the umbrella of the Freshman Leadership Organization (FLO)

    Did David score the winning goal?  Did they win the Lonestar Alliance conference championship?  No, one of their own was competing and they came to cheer him on!  That’s it.  What a fine group of young adults!

  • Password Myths

    Posted on January 27th, 2017 Alan 1 comment

    You can find plenty of arguments to counter the points made in the article linked below, but I happen to agree with many of the points made.
    I password is useless if you can’t remember it and these days, we all have tons we have to remember.

    At work I had to write a password validator to use in a mobile app’s enrollment screen.  I chose to only allow the special characters found on a standard keyboard. No extended ascii characters allowed.   Limiting support calls was my main motivation.

    Myth #2. Dj#wP3M$c is a Great Password

    A common myth is that totally random passwords spit out by password generators are the best passwords. This is not true. While they may in fact be strong passwords, they are usually difficult to remember, slow to type, and sometimes vulnerable to attacks against the password generating algorithm. It is easy to create passwords that are just as strong but much easier to remember by using a few simple techniques. For example, consider the password “Makeit20@password.com”. This password utilizes upper and lower-case letters, two numbers, and two symbols. The password is 20 characters long and can be memorized with very little effort; perhaps even by the time you finish this article. Moreover, this password can be typed very fast. The portion “Makeit20” alternates between left and right-handed keys on the keyboard, improving speed, decreasing typos, and decreasing the chances of someone being able to discover your password by watching you (for a list of nearly eight thousand English words that alternate between left and right-handed keys, see http://www.xato.net/downloads/lrwords.txt.)

    The best technique for creating complex passwords that are easier to remember is to use data structures that we are accustomed to remembering. Such structures also make it easy to include punctuation characters in the password, as in the e-mail address example used above. Other data structures that are easy to remember are phone numbers, addresses, names, file paths, etc. Consider also that certain elements make things more memorable for us. For example, patterns, repetition, rhymes, humor, and even offensive words all make passwords that we will never forget.

    Click here for full article

     

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  • How to refresh Facebook cache

    Posted on January 8th, 2017 Alan No comments

    When creating a Facebook post, if you include a url to a website, Facebook will preview the website in your post.  Facebook looks in a cached version of the home page so if it has changed since Facebook cached it, it may not preview correctly.  To force Facebook to fetch a fresh version, go here: https://developers.facebook.com/tools/debug/

     

  • David Kleymeyer 2016 Senior Lacrosse Highlights

    Posted on December 27th, 2016 Alan No comments

  • Cassidy’s Buick Encore

    Posted on November 24th, 2016 Alan No comments

    Been full time with GM since Sept 26th (started as contractor Feb 22).  Thought I’d eat my own dog food.  I don’t currently work on anything in GM cars, I’m working on the rider and driver Android apps for Maven Shuttle used for managing reservations for shuttle services on campuses.

    Kristen is about to get her license so needing another car, decided to get Cassidy this car and let Kristen inherit the Kia Sportage.  Didn’t even need to use my employee discount.  Year-end 20% off offer was too good to pass up on this 2016 Buick Encore.

    cassidyencore2016_sm

  • Kristen Kleymeyer ’19 Basketball Warriors 2016

    Posted on July 3rd, 2016 Alan No comments